Cursed Mummies

The Curse

According to legend, the curse of the pharaohs will be cast on whoever disturbs the mummy or tomb of an ancient Egyptian. The curse doesn’t care if you’re a serious-minded archaeologist or an opportunistic thief – and the spell is especially powerful if the mummy happens to be a pharaoh. Over the years, there have been numerous reports of cursed archaeological sites, where excavators and tomb robbers began to experience strange sensations, sudden illnesses, and even death after coming in contact with a mummy or an ancient Egyptian artifact.  

When King Tutankhamen’s tomb was discovered on November 26, 1922—after more than 3000 years of uninterrupted repose—some believed the pharaoh unleashed a powerful curse of death and destruction upon all who dared disturb his eternal slumber. One of the most famous archaeologists who got cursed was Lord Carnarvon, who, along with Howard Carter, discovered King Tut’s tomb. His death was the first among many related to that site. Some people attribute these deaths to other, more science-based reasons, but there are still a lot of eerie coincidences in these anecdotes.

The first and most publicized death was that of the Egyptologist Lord Carnarvon. He and Howard Carter were the ones to open Tut’s tomb. Carnarvon died a few months after the discovery from an infected mosquito bite on his cheek. The death had an eerie tie to Tut: when an autopsy was performed on the pharaoh’s body, a similar lesion was found on his cheek. Also, when Carnarvon died, all of the lights in his house were rumored to have suddenly blacked out with no explanation.

Death Shall Come On Swift Wings

When King Tutankhamen’s tomb was found, journalists reported that the following inscription was near the door: “Death shall come on swift wings to him who disturbs the peace of the King.” In fact, there were several mysterious deaths surrounding the opening of Tut’s tomb. The first and most publicized death was that of the Egyptologist Lord Carnarvon. He and Howard Carter were the ones to open Tut’s tomb. Carnarvon died a few months after the discovery from an infected mosquito bite on his cheek. The death had an eerie tie to Tut: when an autopsy was performed on the pharaoh’s body, a similar lesion was found on his cheek. Also, when Carnarvon died, all of the lights in his house were rumored to have suddenly blacked out with no explanation.

Carnarvon wasn’t the only one to fall victim to Tut’s curse. Howard Carter gave his friend Sir Bruce Ingham a paperweight made of a mummified hand, with a bracelet with the following inscription: “Cursed be he who moves my body. To him shall come fire, water and pestilence.” After Ingham received this gift, his house burned down. Once he had finally rebuilt it, it was hit by a flood. George Jay Gould, Audrey Herbert, Hugh Evelyn-White, Aaron Ember, and Archibald Douglas Reed are also said to be victims of the curse. Like Carnarvon, they all died shortly after coming into contact with Tut’s mummy or artifacts within his tomb.

Cursed Mummie On Titanic

The Unlucky Mummy” isn’t a mummy at all, but a “painted wooden mummy-board of an unidentified woman.” This mummy-board is currently housed at the British Museum in London, but rumor had it, it got around in its day. Apparently, during its early time at the museum, the staff would hear loud banging coming from the artifact. One man took a photograph of the mummy-board and was horrified by the image that appeared once he developed the photograph.

The eerie events continued until a museum guard died of suspicious circumstances. Believing the coffin was cursed, the museum wanted to get rid of it as quickly as possible, so it was sold to an American archaeologist. He took the mummy-board with him onto his America-bound ship, the Titanic. Some people speculate that the presence of the cursed mummy-board caused its disastrous sinking.

The Mummie And The Ghost

In 1699, Louis Penicher wrote of a mummy’s curse in his book Traite des Embaumemens. He recounted the story of a Polish man who had purchased two mummies from Alexandria, presumably to study them for medicinal purposes. As he was sailing home across the Mediterranean Sea, he began to be haunted by two ghosts who suddenly appeared on the boat. The man acted quickly, throwing the mummies overboard. His visions of spectral beings stopped as soon as the bodies were swallowed by the sea.

TOMB OF SENMUT

The curse written on the wall at the tomb of Senmut translates to mean, ‘His lifetime shall not exist on earth.’ The tomb was made for Queen Hatshepsut of Senenmut’s (also known as Senmut) royal adviser. He was a powerful man of his time and allowed to build his tomb close to the one built for the Queen pharaoh which was a rare privilege for anyone of non-royal blood. After the Queen died he was forgotten and the tomb never completed. The paintings and subscription’s inside are well preserved, including the ancient curse. Its not yet open to the public but efforts are underway to make it accessible.

BAHARIYA OASIS

An archeologist was assisting with removing two mummy’s from the Bahariya Oasis tomb and he was haunted by dreams of children during the procedure. The dreams only stopped after the mummy of the father was reunited with the children at the museum. Many people involved with removing mummy’s or traveling with them in their possession have been haunted by strange dreams until the mummy’s were no longer in their possession.

SAKKARA

Workmen spent the day on March 10, 1971 clearing a tomb in the digging grounds of Sakkara, only 20 miles from Cairo. The head of the dig was Walter Bryan Emery who found a small statue of the Egyptian god Osiris. He carried it back with him to the village where there was a small house. He left it with his assistant who later reported Emery went into the washroom and started moaning. The assistant reported Emery stood there paralyzed and he called for help. At the hospital he was diagnosed as paralyzed on his right side. By the next morning he was dead.

TURNING STATUE

In late 2013, a Manchester museum was haunted with an Egyptian statue that rotated 180 degrees every three days seemingly on its own. The statue was in a glass case and untouched from everyone except from the curator who kept turning it back. The museums curator claimed the ancient Egyptians believed if the mummy was destroyed then the statuette could be used as an alternative vessel for the spirit. A time lapse video has been sped up to clearly show the statue moving without being touched

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